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Author Archives: Eileen Tonick

About Eileen Tonick

Angel Dogs, provides dog training, puppy training, dog agility training, dog obedience training and therapy dog training throughout the Phoenix, Arizona Metro Area.

Hard of Hearing Dogs

I have a dog that went deaf around 8 years of age and now is totally deaf. I found out that Tank was going deaf by his response to noise. For instance, clapping behind him he seemed confused by where the noise was coming from and eventually didn’t respond at all. I took Tank to a specialist and my thoughts were confirmed Tank was at that time 80% deaf. Fortunately, I trained Tank with hand signals and that has been a tremendous help but the biggest issue is having Tank come to me if he was not facing me. That can be scary because if Tank should take off he could not hear things that could hurt him or even end his life. My world changed on how I handle and protect Tank and, now I want to share this information with other owners who are is facing the same issues as I.

In a class I teach students:

  1. How to teach your dog to focus or look at you with a touch and hand signal. Treats are a must in all of these exercises and a training collar. One exercise I like is the look at me game. Practice in a quiet area, have a treat bag attached to you, leash your dog and put the leash on the ground stepping on it so your dog cannot move away, and have the training collar on a low setting. Put the treat under the dog’s nose so they can smell it than quickly move the treat to your nose as the dog looks at you smile and tap your nose. When using the training collar as you put the treat under the dogs nose tap the control button to get the dogs attention, quickly move the treat to your nose so the dog make eye contact. The goal is to teach your dog to look at you whenever you touch their nose.
  2. The benefits of basic obedience and how to teach your dog the meaning of each hand signal. Since, your dog cannot hear they may be slower than the average dog because of visual and smell distractions so rule of thumb is be patient and give your dog extra time to learn the exercises. When teaching your dog a hand signal for instance, sit. Have your dog on leash and in an area that is not visually stimulating. Tab your dog’s nose as your dog looks at you give a clear precise hand signal, give your dog at least 3 seconds to respond to the command. If your dog does not respond there is 2 ways to have them sit either using a treat method of putting the treat very close to the dogs nose and slowly go back between the eyes and ears the dog will follow the treat and sit. The second method is touch put your hand on your dog’s shoulders than slowly go towards their tail area give a little pressure and your dog will sit. Have your dog look at you afterwards and give them a signal for being a good dog.
  3. Learn how to operate a dog training collar that has pulsating nick stimulation. Training collars are very important for how are you going to get your dog’s attention if they are running away and not looking at you. When using a training collar pick out the best for you need one that will operate properly and last for years. Some collars have tracking devices so if you lose your dog you will be able to find them quickly. Teaching a dog to respond with a training device; have plenty of treats, have your dog on leash, tap the control panel and give your dog a treat, repeat several times till your dog looks at you when you tap the control. This may take one day or more be patient. When your dog starts to understand that when they receive a signal from the collar they are to look at you. This is the time when you start to change your body position for instance, stand behind your dog signal them they should turn and look at you immediately give your dog a treat. As the weeks pass put more distance use a long led if you are working outside. By the second month you should be able to go into a different rooms in your home signal your dog and he or she should try to find you. The goal is whenever you signal your dog to come he or she should seek you out.

Dogs and Heat Stroke

On summer days if you are feeling hot your dog may be feeling hotter. Dogs don’t sweat like we do, so they have to rely on panting, which is not as effective at cooling them down. Heat stroke can happen fast and its effects can be devastating for your pet. That’s why prevention is very important.

 Signs of Heat Stroke in Dogs:

 Rapid panting, sweaty feet, drooling

  • Excessive grooming
  • Rapid pulse and breathing
  • Redness of the tongue and mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Stumbling, staggering gait
  • Pacing

If your pet is just starting to show sign of distress from the heat, or if you think your dog is suffering from heat exhaustion or heat stroke, take a few step to start the cooling process. Most important, don’t let efforts to help your pet delay you more than a few moments from getting to the vet, as time is critical for animals suffering heat stroke.

What to do if Your Pet Is Suffering From Heat Stroke:

 Move your pet/dog to a cool area

  • Offer lots of water to drink
  • Wet down the skin with cool water
  • Avoid freezing water or ice-these can cause blood vessels to constrict, slowing the cooling process and ice can damage the skin
  • Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately

 

 

Why Teach Dogs Hand Signals

When teaching a dog basic obedience commands I always incorporate hand signals. Why would I do this type of training?:

  1. Dogs are very visual they learn quickly by watching body language.
  2. Words do not mean that much to them they learn by the tone of your voice and certain body motions.
  3. In my class, I have a session called silent training most owners are surprised how quickly a dog response to just hand signals.
  4. Hand signals keeps a dogs attention more on you than surroundings.
  5. If your dog is semi-deaf or deaf hand signals are a wonderful way to train.
  6. If the owner can’t talk it is the best option to train their dog.
  7. Training with hand signals is fun and a great way to impress your family and friends.

 

Dog Safety When In a Car

Car Safety for Your Dog
When traveling with your beloved pet there is several things you should take into consideration to make it safe for your dog.
1st: Make sure your dog is secure pet seat belts are a great safety device.
2nd: Do not let your dog sit in your lap or ride in the front seat just too dangerous. Air bags can break your dogs neck.
3rd: If your dog is small provide a safety seat so your dog is secure and can see out the window.
4th: If you crate your dog make sure the crate is secure and that your dog can get plenty of fresh air.
5th: In your glove box or where you keep vehicle information provide a sheet of paper with your dogs name, veteraninarian contact information, a family member or friend contact number. In case you are in an accident or unconscious the police know what to do with your dog.
6th: Have pleanty of water in case your car breaks down.
7th: Do not let your dog ride in a bed of a truck. Your dog can fall out of the truck if your are in an accident.
8th: Do not leave your dog in a car during extreme weather conditions.
These are just a few suggestions just think of your dogs safety and have a safe journey wherever you go.

Come Command Game for Dogs

Trying to have your puppy or dog come to you can become frustrating at times and often dog owners become lost in how to accomplish this skill. The answer is making come a fun and exciting game full of praise and reward so that your dog will love to play the game “come”.

Tools you will need: a long lead, treats, toy, 2 chairs and a great attitude.

Place the chairs about 10 to 15 feet apart. (play this game at first in the home)

  1. Both participants have treats in a bag or can so when you shake it the noise will attract the dog. If you clicker trained your dog you can use a clicker.
  2. The first person calls the dog to come, “Fido Come” while shaking the can or using the clicker
  3. The minute the dog acknowledges you start saying, “Good Dog” in a happy and exciting voice.
  4. When the dog comes to you reward the dog with a treat or a toy if that is what the dog prefers.
  5. Than the second person calls the dog while the first person become quiet and still so the dog will leave them and go to the second person.
  6. Repeat several times than end the game do not make the game so long that the dog becomes bored and ends the game themselves.
  7. The next time you play the game move the chairs further apart the goal is to create a lot of distance between the chairs. You might need a long lead at this time.
  8. When the dog becomes really good at this game introduce distractions such as other people or other dogs.
  9. To add more challenges go to different rooms in the home for instance one person in the kitchen the other in a bedroom.
  10. The backyard offers even more distractions and challenges if needed put the dog on leash so she or he can’t wander off.
  11. Always make this game fun and rewarding never enter negative energy always positive and you will have the best results.

Semi-Deaf or Deaf Dogs

Semi-Deaf or Deaf Dogs

Training Methods

I have a dog that went deaf around 8 years of age and now is totally deaf. I found out that Tank was going deaf by his response to noise. For instance, clapping behind him he seemed confused by where the noise was coming from and eventually didn’t respond at all. I took Tank to a specialist and my thoughts were confirmed Tank was at that time 80% deaf. Fortunately, I trained Tank with hand signals and that has been a tremendous help but the biggest issue is having Tank come to me if he was not facing me. That can be scary because if Tank should take off he could not hear things that could hurt him or even end his life such as a car. My world changed on how I handle and protect Tank and, now I want to share this information with other owners who are is facing the same issues as I.

What you need to work on:

  1. You need to teach your dog to focus or look at you with a touch hand signal.
  2. You need to teach your dog basic obedience hand signals.
  3. Learn how to operate a dog training collar that has pulsating nick stimulation.
  4. Teach your dog to walk nicely on a leash.
  5. Learn to walk your dog on a gentle leader.
  6. Body language is important so learn how your dog responds.
  7. Patience and calmness will excel your dogs learning.

Come join me in a dog group class that will be geared for semi-deaf or deaf dogs. Together we will learn how to teach your dog and help them have a more positive responsive.

Teaching Your Dog to Come Off Leash

Come Game: In home practice with a treat can filled with the best dogs treats and make sure when you shake the can it will make a noise easily heard.

 

  • Shake the can and say your dogs name followed with come example “Tank, Come”
  • The minute your dog starts to acknowledge you and the command start saying, “Good Dog”
  • When your dog comes to you give your dog the treat
  • When your dog becomes proficient with this game have someone place your dog in another room and call them to you make sure you shake the can
  • As the dog becomes familiar with the game start shaking the can with less intensity and on occasions reward him with a treat
  • Goal is to eventually just call your dog to you without the shake can and treats

 

In the back yard: You will need the shake can and a long lead training leash do not use extension leashes.

  • Attach the long lead and let your dog roam around the yard
  • Plan when you are going to call him and follow the instructions mentioned above
  • Practice with leash for 2 weeks than remove the lead and practice the game
  • Keep the game fun and exciting

 

As your dog becomes proficient with the come game in all circumstances than go to a park and practice make sure to use the long training lead.

Dog Body Language

Whenever you are around dogs it is important that you learn their body language to prevent getting bit, avoiding fights between dogs, knowing when your dog is calm, nervous or assertive. Dogs do not talk as you well know but they do communicate with their bodies. It is always a great idea to learn their language for than you will truly know what your dog is saying.

Attentive:

  • Ears up
  • Eyes moving, not fixed
  • Lips relaxed
  • Head up, hair down
  • Weight equally distributed
  • Tail stiff and horizontal
  • Tail moving slowly as aroused
  • Non-verbal

 

Playful:

  • Ears up
  • Eyes relaxed
  • Hair down
  • Leaning back, weight shifted to rear
  • Front foot may wave a target
  • Tail wagging high, broad, fast
  • Animated, exaggerated, bouncing movements
  • May pant, bark or whine

 

Aggression:

  • Ears forward at first, out and down as escalates, back when attacking
  • Eyes fixed, staring at target
  • Lips raised, mouth slightly open
  • Nose wrinkled
  • Head high
  • Hair raised over rump and back of neck
  • Leaning forward, weight shifted to front
  • Body stiff, tense
  • Front leg may point a target
  • Tail stiff and high over back, tip may quiver
  • May growl, snarl and bark

 

Submissive:

  • Ears down
  • Eyes down
  • Lips down, retracted horizontally
  • Head down
  • Hair down
  • Leaning back, weight shifted to rear
  • Tail may wag horizontally, hang down or be tucked close to body
  • May whine

 

Passively Submissive:

  • Ears down
  • Eyes down
  • Lips down
  • Hair down
  • Head down
  • Lying on side or back
  • Tail tucked close to body
  • May urinate

 

Fearful: (displacement signals

  • Ears back and down
  • Eyes wide open and fixed (whale eye)
  • Mouth open slightly
  • Head down
  • Hair raised over neck
  • Leaning back, weight shifted to rear
  • Tail tucked tight under abdomen
  • May tremble and defecate or urinate
  • Makes fast moves if threatened
  • Looks for escape routes
  • Whines
  • Excessive sniffing the ground
  • Hair will start to fall out
  • Paws can start to sweat
  • May try to look small by hunching
  • Drooling

The Dangers of Dog Food

A few years back my dogs were dying of different forms of cancer and all four died at a very young age. It was devastating and from this experience I decided to find out why my dogs health was so poor. As I did my research I found out that a lot of the dog foods sold in America had poor ingredients. So I decided to find healthier dog foods and find out if my newest dogs would be healthier. Turns out 10 years later that my dogs are in really good health due to changing their dog food. Recently, I read an interesting article on dog foods in America at Reviews.com and was so impressed that I wanted to post the Http address so others could read this valuable article. I highly suggest that all dog owners read this article it will be helpful when selecting the best dog food for your dog. Please go to Http://www.reviews.com/dog-food/ and read this very information article on dog food.

Treating Fear in Dogs Concerning Thunderstorms or Loud Noises

Monsoon season and the 4th of July is almost here and with that it may cause a fear response in your dog. Some of the signs of fear are the dog’s tail in tucked way under the dog’s belly, shaking, drooling, panting, pacing, barking, whining, etc. How can you treat a dog who is fearful of loud noises? What can you do to help your dog and stop them from being so fearful.

Below I have wrote a few suggestion on helping your dog overcome these fears.

If your dog is fearful of loud noises, make a recording of the noise and see whether the recording causes fear. If it does, you have a controllable stimulus to use in retraining.

Using food rewards, train your dog to lie quietly on a rug and once he is fully trained, expose him to the frightening sound but at a very low level, perhaps even below your own hearing frequency.

Reward him for showing no signs of fear. Gradually, increase the intensity of the sound, boosting it every five minutes over a period of 30 to 40 minutes.

Daily treatment periods of 40 to 50 minutes are best and you should expect training to consume around one month total before a dog is desensitized to 90 decibel noise.

Once your dog shows no fear to thunder, you should play your recording during the season when there are no naturally occurring thunderstorms, so that you can reinforce his or hers new behavior.