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dog socialization

Hard of Hearing Dogs

I have a dog that went deaf around 8 years of age and now is totally deaf. I found out that Tank was going deaf by his response to noise. For instance, clapping behind him he seemed confused by where the noise was coming from and eventually didn’t respond at all. I took Tank to a specialist and my thoughts were confirmed Tank was at that time 80% deaf. Fortunately, I trained Tank with hand signals and that has been a tremendous help but the biggest issue is having Tank come to me if he was not facing me. That can be scary because if Tank should take off he could not hear things that could hurt him or even end his life. My world changed on how I handle and protect Tank and, now I want to share this information with other owners who are is facing the same issues as I.

In a class I teach students:

  1. How to teach your dog to focus or look at you with a touch and hand signal. Treats are a must in all of these exercises and a training collar. One exercise I like is the look at me game. Practice in a quiet area, have a treat bag attached to you, leash your dog and put the leash on the ground stepping on it so your dog cannot move away, and have the training collar on a low setting. Put the treat under the dog’s nose so they can smell it than quickly move the treat to your nose as the dog looks at you smile and tap your nose. When using the training collar as you put the treat under the dogs nose tap the control button to get the dogs attention, quickly move the treat to your nose so the dog make eye contact. The goal is to teach your dog to look at you whenever you touch their nose.
  2. The benefits of basic obedience and how to teach your dog the meaning of each hand signal. Since, your dog cannot hear they may be slower than the average dog because of visual and smell distractions so rule of thumb is be patient and give your dog extra time to learn the exercises. When teaching your dog a hand signal for instance, sit. Have your dog on leash and in an area that is not visually stimulating. Tab your dog’s nose as your dog looks at you give a clear precise hand signal, give your dog at least 3 seconds to respond to the command. If your dog does not respond there is 2 ways to have them sit either using a treat method of putting the treat very close to the dogs nose and slowly go back between the eyes and ears the dog will follow the treat and sit. The second method is touch put your hand on your dog’s shoulders than slowly go towards their tail area give a little pressure and your dog will sit. Have your dog look at you afterwards and give them a signal for being a good dog.
  3. Learn how to operate a dog training collar that has pulsating nick stimulation. Training collars are very important for how are you going to get your dog’s attention if they are running away and not looking at you. When using a training collar pick out the best for you need one that will operate properly and last for years. Some collars have tracking devices so if you lose your dog you will be able to find them quickly. Teaching a dog to respond with a training device; have plenty of treats, have your dog on leash, tap the control panel and give your dog a treat, repeat several times till your dog looks at you when you tap the control. This may take one day or more be patient. When your dog starts to understand that when they receive a signal from the collar they are to look at you. This is the time when you start to change your body position for instance, stand behind your dog signal them they should turn and look at you immediately give your dog a treat. As the weeks pass put more distance use a long led if you are working outside. By the second month you should be able to go into a different rooms in your home signal your dog and he or she should try to find you. The goal is whenever you signal your dog to come he or she should seek you out.

Dogs and Heat Stroke

On summer days if you are feeling hot your dog may be feeling hotter. Dogs don’t sweat like we do, so they have to rely on panting, which is not as effective at cooling them down. Heat stroke can happen fast and its effects can be devastating for your pet. That’s why prevention is very important.

 Signs of Heat Stroke in Dogs:

 Rapid panting, sweaty feet, drooling

  • Excessive grooming
  • Rapid pulse and breathing
  • Redness of the tongue and mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Stumbling, staggering gait
  • Pacing

If your pet is just starting to show sign of distress from the heat, or if you think your dog is suffering from heat exhaustion or heat stroke, take a few step to start the cooling process. Most important, don’t let efforts to help your pet delay you more than a few moments from getting to the vet, as time is critical for animals suffering heat stroke.

What to do if Your Pet Is Suffering From Heat Stroke:

 Move your pet/dog to a cool area

  • Offer lots of water to drink
  • Wet down the skin with cool water
  • Avoid freezing water or ice-these can cause blood vessels to constrict, slowing the cooling process and ice can damage the skin
  • Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately



The Dogs Early Learning Development

The concept of “critical periods” in the emotional development of the dog is a well documented one. Dogs that are denied human contact until they are over 12 weeks of age seldom make good companions. Somewhere in that time span is the “critical period” during which dogs can be socialized to another species, us. Research into critical periods in the development of the dog’s mind has been carried out since the early 1960’s. In 1961, the magazine Science published the results of the most elaborate and definitive experiment that had been carried out to that date, a report that concluded that socialization in dogs, the ability to learn to live compatibly with dogs and with us ends at 12 weeks of age and that the most critical period was 6 to 8 weeks of age.
Later on, in 1967, Science published again on the subject. The magazine reported Scott and Fuller’s work which showed that pups raised in completed isolation to 7 weeks of age could still recover completely and become socially normal. They also reported that outside contacts as infrequent as twice a week and for only twenty minutes each time were enough to ensure normal development as long as these outside contacts occurred in the critical period between 4 and 12 weeks.
Out of this and other research came the concept of the first critical period, this lasts from birth to 12 weeks of age, in the development of the dog’s mind. It was divided up this way:
1. Neonatal period:                              0 to 2 weeks
2. Transitional period:                        2 to 4 weeks
3. Socialization period :- to dogs        4 to 6 weeks
                                        – to humans   4 to 12 weeks Read More